Online tutoring has seen a spike in popularity in the past few years. Many sites are offering various online tutoring services, covering courses from primary to higher education level. Due to such demands, people are wanting to seize this opportunity by claiming to be real tutors. These so called ‘tutors’ are exploiting the online market by taking advantage of people who are looking for private tutors to help with their learning. So, how do you protect yourself from getting scammed?

Check the legitimacy

Doing a background check on the individual and company that are offering online tutoring services is crucial. Most sites have reviews or testimonials from previous parents or students who have used the tutor’s services. By reading the reviews, you’ll get to identify whether the source is verifiable. Apart from that, you can go onto the tutor’s social media profiles to check their his authenticity.

If you’re still not convinced, trust word of mouth referrals from people you know or simply contact the tutor via phone if you have further enquiries.

The individual or website should disclose how and when they’re paid

Most tutors or companies would request a deposit upfront before the lessons begins. This is to ensure that customers don’t take advantage on the services. Make sure that they only request full payment once you’re satisfied with the first lesson.

Beware of anyone who wants a complete payment upfront because chances are, you won’t be getting your money back as well as those lessons.

Payment method

Paying fees to a home tutor isn’t an issue because clearly you know with whom you’re dealing with. But how about those working behind the screen aka online tutors? In this case, you need to find their method of payment. Online tutors and companies should accept every major credit card, the least.

Find out the types of software they’re using

Having a phone chat or email aren’t good enough to be proven genuine. Virtual classrooms usually require many apps or software for the lessons to go on. Sharing notes and videos should be done on reputable platforms so lessons wouldn’t be abrupted. If the tutor insists on conducting classes via an unsupported platform, then you’ll know what kind of deal you’re getting into.

Suspicious email domains

If a tutoring website doesn’t have a physical address for you to check or is using suspicious email domains, chances are the website isn’t legitimate. Another telling sign is if the email link you received from the site directs you to a suspicious page. Hence, check the email domains carefully for the authenticity.